Society's News


Corporate Members 2019

3PB Albion Chambers Ashfords Barcan + Kirby Burges Salmon Capstones Clarke Willmott Cooke Painter Ltd DAC Beachcroft Devereux & Co Enterprise Chambers The Family Law Practice Foot Anstey (including Enable Law) Fussell Wright Gregg Latchams Ltd Guildhall Chambers Irwin Mitchell Solicitors Kelcey & Hall Lyons Davidson Marc White & Co Meade King Michelmores LLP Osborne Clarke Queen Square Chambers Simmons … more


President’s Charity of the Year – Bristol Children’s Help Society

                            The Bristol Children’s Help Society is a privately funded volunteer led charity that owns and runs Barton Camp our 100 bed residential children’s centre in the beautiful Mendip hills. Barton Camp operates through the year as a base where disadvantaged local children can enjoy a few … more


No 12, The Meeting Rooms – Conference, Meeting and Mediation Rooms for Hire

Bristol Law Society’s suite of conference and meeting rooms including a suite of mediation rooms are conveniently located in the centre between the Waterfront Area and the Old City in a modern building situated on the corner of Colston Avenue and St Stephen’s Avenue. There are a number of large public car parks within a 5 minute walk from the … more


A.H. WANSEY


Arthur Henry Wansey was President of Bristol Law Society from 1891-2.

The London Gazette of May 17th 1859 refers to an auction of the Netham chemical works comprising freehold and leasehold property in St George on the banks of the River Avon. The land together with all building, plant and machinery had previously been owned by Stephen Cox (the lease being for the annual rent of £120) was to be auctioned in the Commercial Rooms in Corn Street pursuant to an order from the Chancery Court. The London Gazette reports that particulars of the property could be viewed in the offices of Palmer and Wansey on Corn Street.

Wansey could not have been in practice for very long, being born in 1827 in Warminster. He was to move to Clifton, building a house called Sambourne on the Clifton Downs near to Sea Walls. Wansey was a Non-Conformist, enjoyed hunting and shooting and went on regular fly-fishing holidays to Ireland and Scotland. He came to the Law at an early age, practising from the early 1950s. He first went into partnership with Henry Palmer, who was his brother-in-law, and in 1860 Wansey became Registrar of the Tolzey Court (a position that Palmer had previously held) later becoming a Deputy Judge.

 

In 1863 A.H. Wansey’s office was at 24 Clare Street, which was also the Tolzey Court Office, while in 1887 his office was in St. Stephens’ Chambers on Baldwin Street. Wansey’s son Arthur Edward joined him in practice following his passing of the Law examinations, but sadly died in 1892. By 1897 A.H. Wansey’s firm was still known under the title of A.H. Wansey and Son, although his only other surviving son had joined the Church. Following the death of his son, Wansey went into partnership with Edward Meade-King and by 1908 the firm was known as Wansey and Meade-King.

Wansey died in October 1902 aged 74 and his obituary in the Bristol Mercury described him as a man of commanding presence and looks with a genial and kindly nature. He had an “old time courtesy which impressed itself on all those who had dealings with him”.