Society's News


The President’s Charity of the Year 2017/18

                      Please see Freewheelers Leaflet 2017 for the fabulous work these volunteer riders undertake to assist the NHS in moving vital supplies and equipment  around the county. Who knows which one of us or someone we know may have already benefited from their amazing work?


Welcome from BLS President 2017/18 – Gary Lightwood

                    Gary Lightwood is the Managing Partner of Pattinson & Brewer Solicitors’ Bristol office. During his career he has specialised in personal injury litigation, clinical negligence and family law. A former Officer in the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy, Gary then qualified as a Solicitor in 1996 after joining … more


BLS Conference and Meeting Room Suites Room Hire Information

Bristol Law Society’s suite of conference and meeting rooms are conveniently located in the centre between the Waterfront Area and the Old City in a modern building situated on the corner of Colston Avenue and St Stephen’s Avenue.  There are a number of large public car parks within a 5 minute walk from the rooms. For full information on our … more


A.H. WANSEY


Arthur Henry Wansey was President of Bristol Law Society from 1891-2.

The London Gazette of May 17th 1859 refers to an auction of the Netham chemical works comprising freehold and leasehold property in St George on the banks of the River Avon. The land together with all building, plant and machinery had previously been owned by Stephen Cox (the lease being for the annual rent of £120) was to be auctioned in the Commercial Rooms in Corn Street pursuant to an order from the Chancery Court. The London Gazette reports that particulars of the property could be viewed in the offices of Palmer and Wansey on Corn Street.

Wansey could not have been in practice for very long, being born in 1827 in Warminster. He was to move to Clifton, building a house called Sambourne on the Clifton Downs near to Sea Walls. Wansey was a Non-Conformist, enjoyed hunting and shooting and went on regular fly-fishing holidays to Ireland and Scotland. He came to the Law at an early age, practising from the early 1950s. He first went into partnership with Henry Palmer, who was his brother-in-law, and in 1860 Wansey became Registrar of the Tolzey Court (a position that Palmer had previously held) later becoming a Deputy Judge.

 

In 1863 A.H. Wansey’s office was at 24 Clare Street, which was also the Tolzey Court Office, while in 1887 his office was in St. Stephens’ Chambers on Baldwin Street. Wansey’s son Arthur Edward joined him in practice following his passing of the Law examinations, but sadly died in 1892. By 1897 A.H. Wansey’s firm was still known under the title of A.H. Wansey and Son, although his only other surviving son had joined the Church. Following the death of his son, Wansey went into partnership with Edward Meade-King and by 1908 the firm was known as Wansey and Meade-King.

Wansey died in October 1902 aged 74 and his obituary in the Bristol Mercury described him as a man of commanding presence and looks with a genial and kindly nature. He had an “old time courtesy which impressed itself on all those who had dealings with him”.