Society's News


John Moriarty elected as new President

At the BLS AGM, held on 26th November, John Moriarty was elected as President following in the footsteps of Andrew Gregg as one of the handful of Presidents to hold office for a second time. At the AGM, outgoing President Michael Gupwell spoke to the assembled audience about his time in office, giving especial thanks to Helen Read and Clair … more


Civil Courts Structure Review (CCSR): Interim Report published

The interim report of Lord Justice Briggs’ Civil Courts Structure Review was published on 12 January. He has invited comments in writing on the interim report by the end of February 2016; ahead of further consultation on, and consideration of, issues ahead of preparing the final Review report by the end of July 2016. Comments may be sent to: ccsr@ejudiciary.net For … more


How can legal practitioners protect themselves from increasingly common conveyancing professional negligence claims?

Jonathan Simon, Executive Director, Willis looks at risks of professional negligence in conveyancing. Conveyancing claims, in my experience as a broker, account for roughly a third of all notifications of claims against solicitors, but during a recession the figure can rise to closer to half. As the UK economy has been out of recession for some time, and property teams … more


A NOTARY’S LIFE FOR ME


Michael Gupwell of Gregg Latchams is a Notary Public. In this article, he draws back the veil of secrecy and introduces the role of a Notary.

Notaries public are a distinct type of lawyer, separate from solicitors or barristers, whose origins date back to Roman times.

A notary public’s role is to execute or certify documents where required, which is usually when the documents are for use in a foreign jurisdiction.  The notary will identify the appearer and verify their authority and capacity, before ensuring that they understand and intend the purpose of the document for execution.  They will then ensure that the document is executed validly for the jurisdiction where the document is to be used and notarise the document with their signature and unique seal.

Certain jurisdictions have further requirements before the documents can be used and a notary can advise about what might be required and help the appearer arrange for the further steps to be undertaken.

Most notaries are or have been solicitors, but it is not a necessary requirement.  However, the notarial qualification has certain obligatory elements, some of which are completed as part of becoming a solicitor or barrister.  The other learning elements are covered on the Notarial Practice Course, which will be run by University College London from the Autumn of 2012.  The best way to find out more, and a requirement for passing the course, is attendance at one of the Notaries Society Open Days.

After passing the Notarial Practice Course and meeting the requirements to be awarded their notarial faculty, a notary then has to successfully complete a 2 year period of supervision before finally being able to practise fully independently.

For further information, contact Michael Gupwell at michael.gupwell@gregglatchams.com