Society's News


Corporate Members 2021

3PB Albion Chambers Ashfords Barcan + Kirby Battens Beale & Co BLM Burges Salmon Clarke Willmott CMS CMNO Cooke Painter Ltd Clyde & Co DAC Beachcroft The Family Law Practice Foot Anstey (including Enable Law) Fussell Wright GL Law Guildhall Chambers Irwin Mitchell Solicitors Lyons Davidson Marc White & Co Meade King Osborne Clarke Paragon Costs Solutions Queen Square Chambers … more


BLS features in Bristol Post oldest thriving companies in Bristol

Excerpt from the article: How Bristol’s oldest companies are still thriving after more than 100 years in business They include the city’s last-surviving chocolate maker a wine merchant and a tannery. Why do some companies struggle to survive beyond a year while others flourish for hundreds? Although more than 90 per cent of small companies in Britain will survive one … more


No 12, The Meeting Rooms – Conference, Meeting and Mediation Rooms for Hire

Please note that the BLS office is shut to members at present as we continue to work from home during the pandemic. We can be contacted on info@bristollawsociety.com. In the meantime, our office is now operating as the Bristol Nightingale Court and accordingly, we are unable to hire out our facilities until further notice. (Oct 2020) Bristol Law Society’s suite … more


A NOTARY’S LIFE FOR ME


Michael Gupwell of Gregg Latchams is a Notary Public. In this article, he draws back the veil of secrecy and introduces the role of a Notary.

Notaries public are a distinct type of lawyer, separate from solicitors or barristers, whose origins date back to Roman times.

A notary public’s role is to execute or certify documents where required, which is usually when the documents are for use in a foreign jurisdiction.  The notary will identify the appearer and verify their authority and capacity, before ensuring that they understand and intend the purpose of the document for execution.  They will then ensure that the document is executed validly for the jurisdiction where the document is to be used and notarise the document with their signature and unique seal.

Certain jurisdictions have further requirements before the documents can be used and a notary can advise about what might be required and help the appearer arrange for the further steps to be undertaken.

Most notaries are or have been solicitors, but it is not a necessary requirement.  However, the notarial qualification has certain obligatory elements, some of which are completed as part of becoming a solicitor or barrister.  The other learning elements are covered on the Notarial Practice Course, which will be run by University College London from the Autumn of 2012.  The best way to find out more, and a requirement for passing the course, is attendance at one of the Notaries Society Open Days.

After passing the Notarial Practice Course and meeting the requirements to be awarded their notarial faculty, a notary then has to successfully complete a 2 year period of supervision before finally being able to practise fully independently.

For further information, contact Michael Gupwell at michael.gupwell@gregglatchams.com