Society's News


Corporate Members 2021

3PB Albion Chambers Ashfords Barcan + Kirby Battens Beale & Co BLM Burges Salmon Clarke Willmott CMS CMNO Cooke Painter Ltd Clyde & Co DAC Beachcroft The Family Law Practice Foot Anstey (including Enable Law) Fussell Wright GL Law Guildhall Chambers Irwin Mitchell Solicitors Lyons Davidson Marc White & Co Meade King Osborne Clarke Paragon Costs Solutions Queen Square Chambers … more


BLS features in Bristol Post oldest thriving companies in Bristol

Excerpt from the article: How Bristol’s oldest companies are still thriving after more than 100 years in business They include the city’s last-surviving chocolate maker a wine merchant and a tannery. Why do some companies struggle to survive beyond a year while others flourish for hundreds? Although more than 90 per cent of small companies in Britain will survive one … more


No 12, The Meeting Rooms – Conference, Meeting and Mediation Rooms for Hire

Please note that the BLS office is shut to members at present as we continue to work from home during the pandemic. We can be contacted on info@bristollawsociety.com. In the meantime, our office is now operating as the Bristol Nightingale Court and accordingly, we are unable to hire out our facilities until further notice. (Oct 2020) Bristol Law Society’s suite … more


LSC to apologise for maladministration following formal Law Society complaint


The Legal Services Commission [LSC] has issued an apology for the maladministration of a financial exercise which caused legal aid solicitors across England and Wales ‘an injustice’.
 
The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman has upheld a complaint from the Law Society that the LSC had failed to run a recoupment exercise in a timely fashion and had failed to adequately inform solicitors about the exercise.
 
The ruling vindicates the Law Society’s concerns about the flawed process implemented by the Commission when it launched the exercise from 2006 onwards to recoup payments on account. 
 
The LSC requested that the firms return the funds, in some cases many years after the client cases had been closed and many firms had destroyed older bulky files.
 
The Law Society, and a host of firms who were affected by the anomaly, made a complaint to the Parliamentary Ombudsman. The LSC will now be required to reconsider representations from individual solicitors who were earlier discouraged from bringing their own complaints, as their matters would be covered by the overall complaint being made by the Society.
 
Firms who had contacted either the Law Society or the LSC about the 2006 recoupment exercise before 31 December 2008 now have until 17 June 2013 to bring their complaints.
 
Responding to the Parliamentary Ombudsman’s report, Richard Miller, Head of Legal Aid at the Law Society, said: “The Law Society has been tenacious in its pursuit of justice on this and we have been vindicated. The Society’s complaints about the delay in the process have been upheld and the Ombudsman agreed that the LSC’s communications with firms were inadequate. We are very pleased that solicitors who were affected by the maladministration now have a right to have their cases properly reconsidered.  It is disappointing that it has taken five years to resolve, but at least the outcome is the correct one.”